Sunscreen safety questioned yet again

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A 2019 study by the U.S. FDA shows four common active ingredients in sunscreen — avobenzone, oxybenzone, octocrylene and ecamsule — are absorbed into your blood at levels that could potentially pose health risks
Systemic concentrations greater than 0.5 ng/mL were reached for all four products after four applications on the first day; 0.5 ng/mL is the FDA maximum threshold for waiving systemic carcinogenicity, developmental and reproductive toxicology studies for sunscreens
Follow-up research confirms systemic concentrations of sunscreen chemicals are up to 500 times higher than the FDA’s assumed safety threshold
Oxybenzone and several other active ingredients in sunscreens enhance the ability of other chemicals to penetrate your skin, including toxic herbicides, pesticides and insect repellants, and act as endocrine disrupters
Despite the endocrine disrupting and neurotoxic effects of oxybenzone, its high absorbability, and the availability of safe sunscreens (those containing non-nanosized zinc oxide and titanium dioxide), the FDA and American Academy of Dermatology urge people to continue using oxybenzone-containing sunscreen on a daily basis
Conventional guidance to avoid unprotected sun exposure at all costs has likely done public health a great disservice. The American Academy of Dermatology,1 for example, stresses daily use of sunscreen to prevent skin cancer, regardless of weather conditions or skin pigmentation — two factors that simply cannot be overlooked when weighing the risks and benefits of sun exposure and sunscreen use.2
A direct result of this blanket recommendation is widespread vitamin D deficiency, which we now know is a risk factor for a wide variety of cancers and many other chronic diseases. Your vitamin D level even influences your risk of skin cancer.
For example, a 2010 study3 found elderly men with the highest quintile of vitamin D had a 47% lower risk of non-melanoma skin cancer compared to those with the lowest levels. Research4 has also shown …
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