Study links consumption of high-fructose corn syrup to…

A recent study has found that high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS), a common sweetener used in soft drinks, promotes the growth of intestinal tumors. Excessive consumption of products sweetened with HFCS is also linked to obesity and metabolic syndrome. According to the researchers behind the study, the epidemic of obesity seen around the world today is primarily caused by the increased consumption of sugar-laden beverages. Coincidentally, this rise in obesity rates is also paralleled by an increase in colorectal cancer incidence, especially among young and middle-aged adults. As early as 2013, studies have emerged suggesting that obesity increases the risk of colorectal cancer. Some of the plausible mechanisms believed to be behind this association include insulin resistance, chronic inflammation and alterations in the levels of growth factors, adipocytokines (hormones secreted by fat cells) and steroid hormones. However, the influence of these proposed mechanisms still remains to be fully explored. Another thing that is unclear about all this is if heavily sweetened products — the main culprits behind obesity — directly promote colorectal cancer development. To remove obesity and the metabolic syndrome as confounding factors, the researchers mimicked the consumption of sugar-laden drinks in mice that have been genetically engineered to develop intestinal tumors. This allowed them to determine whether HFCS, in

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This ethnomedicinal fern from Nepal is rich in antioxidants and essential nutrients

(Natural News) Tectaria coadunate is a species of fern that has attracted scientific interest in recent years. Also known by its local

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