FOOD COLLAPSE imminent? Researchers create “robobees” as last ditch effort to compensate for collapsing bee populations

robobees to the resque

(Natural News) The invention of robot bees – robobees, for short – could be the long-awaited solution to all sorts of problems caused by the dwindling bee population all around the world. Just in case you haven’t heard, the world bee population has been steadily declining. As a result, a number of different environmental problems have emerged. With bees not fulfilling their role as far as pollination is concerned, some flowers and trees are unable to grow.

But things could change rather drastically with the introduction of robobees, as they could stand in for real bees in the meantime. This is according to Shashi Shekhar, one of the world’s foremost experts on mapping, citing the potential of robobees for serving as instruments in solving the catastrophic food shortages happening worldwide. Shekhar shared his thoughts on the matter as a speaker in the world’s biggest science conference. In his view, the time to embrace bee-sized drones to do things like pollinate crops.

According to a report, Shekhar sees the eventual use of robobees as a mere contingency if not a full necessity. “This is a back-up plan,” he explained. “With climate drying, if you look at areas like California and the West, you are losing lots of trees. If you lose the trees that’s the beginning.” Of course, with the loss of trees in forests, you can probably imagine what will be next to go, as there are a lot of animal species relying on them to survive.

Shekhar isn’t the only one who’s looking forward to a future where robobees are prevalent in case things ever truly go south for the environment. It is said that Japanese scientists have already developed a remotely controlled drone that’s as small as a dragonfly and can be used for the act of pollination. Meanwhile, U.S. scientists have also joined the fray. American researchers are currently planning to create an even smaller version of the above, focusing on the ability to carry pollen grains from one place to another and do it autonomously, at that.

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