Health

RoundUp Scandal Still Plaguing Bayer

By Jefferey Jaxen Recent headlines continue to tell the story: Bayer’s Roundup-Cancer Settlement Plan Hits Snag writes Bloomberg. Bayer’s Roundup Settlement Comes Up Short states...

18 sailors injured as US military ship catches fire

 ... & is covered in massive plume of smoke in San Diego The USS Bonhomme Richard has caught fire at a naval base in San Diego. Footage from the scene shows a large plume of smoke emitting from under the ship's deck; one explosion and injuries among the crew have been confirmed. The fire triggered a massive response, with multiple fire engines and ambulances seen at the pier. "Eighteen Sailors have been transferred to a local hospital with non-life threatening injuries," US Naval Surface Forces wrote on Twitter a while later. Officials also announced that all the crewmembers had been evacuated from the ship and accounted for. So far, it remains unclear what triggered the blaze. Local fire department said that at least one explosion occurred aboard the ship during the blaze. The USS Bonhomme Richard is among the nine big-deck amphibious assault ships in the US inventory, capable to carry multiple helicopters, rotary aircraft or up to six VTOL jets. The vessel spent years with the US forces in Japan before being transferred to San Diego for an overhaul in 2018. The fire is the second major incident San Diego, that is a major ship-building and naval hub, seen over

Mom and baby share 'good bacteria' through breast milk

A new study has found that bacteria are shared and possibly transferred from a mother's milk to her infant's gut, and that breastfeeding directly at the breast best supports this process. A new study by researchers at the University of British Columbia and the University of Manitoba has found that bacteria are shared and possibly transferred from a mother's milk to her infant's gut, and that breastfeeding directly at the breast best supports this process. The research, published today in Cell Host & Microbe, found that certain bacteria, including Streptococcus and Veillonella, co-occur in mothers' milk and their infants' stool, and this co-occurrence is higher when infants nurse directly at the breast. "Our study confirms that breast milk is a major driver of infant gut microbiota development," said the study's senior co-author Dr. Stuart Turvey, a professor in UBC's department of pediatrics and investigator at BC Children's Hospital. "We found that breastfeeding exclusivity and duration was strongly associated with a baby's overall gut microbiota composition and that breast milk bacteria shape a baby's gut microbiome to a similar degree as other known modifiers of the gut microbiota such as birth mode—meaning a cesarean-section or vaginal delivery." According to the researchers,

Mountains of microplastics forming at the bottom of the ocean

Plastic may have found its way into the ocean's circulatory system. We already know our love for plastic is as deep as the deepest depths of the ocean. Because, of course, we found it there, way down at the bottom of the Mariana Trench. It takes a special kind of submarine to make that nearly 36,000-feet dive. But candy wrappers? Bon-bon voyage. And while those unwelcome discoveries demonstrate just how pervasive this plastic plague has become, there may be something even more unsettling about these new denizens of the deep-sea. Scientists haven’t been able to account for most of the 8 million tons of it that we heave into the ocean every year. But a new study may have finally answered that question.  The research found that plastic is moving into the deep-sea neighborhoods that anywhere from 500,000 to 10 million species call home. But zip-loc bags among giant spider crabs and tube worms and vampire squid are one thing. Plastic is also finding its way to the vents that literally stir the oceans. Those slow-moving masses of water near the ocean floor, dubbed thermohaline currents, act like a vast circulatory system. They swish around oxygen and nutrients vital to life

NASA's powerful Hubble space telescope

 - has beamed back a striking photo of a 'fluffy' galaxy with a ghostly, empty centre Galaxy NGC 2275, captured by the Hubble Space Telescope, July 2, 2020. NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope recently photographed a fluffy-looking galaxy 67 million light-years away. The galaxy’s centre is quiet, since early star formation used up all its gas long ago. Two upcoming NASA telescopes will succeed Hubble and capture our own galaxy and the universe beyond in unprecedented detail. NASA’s most powerful space telescope, Hubble, captured a uniquely picturesque galaxy in a photo the agency released on Thursday. From New York pizza to Maine lobster rolls, we rounded up the most iconic food in every U.S. state Every state has its own iconic food — Idaho potatoes are world famous, and New York pizza is legendary. Here's a look at the most iconic... From New York pizza to Maine lobster rolls, we rounded up the most iconic food in every U.S. state The galaxy, called NGC 2775, is located 67 million light-years away and doesn’t seem to be forming stars that much anymore. Astronomers can tell that’s the case because of the relatively empty, clear bulge at the galaxy’s centre. When it

Lawrence Krauss – hidden dimensions where the laws of physics are very different

Prof. Lawrence Krauss discussed dimensions cosmology, and science. Currently there is no empirical evidence for dimensions beyond our own, yet he speculated there could be hidden dimensions where the laws of physics are completely different. Gravity might leak off into another dimension, which could explain why its effect is so weak, he added. Upcoming experiments with new particle accelerators might yield definitive signs for such extra dimensions, said Krauss. However, String Theory, which posits an 11-dimensional universe, while highly touted, has yet to yield any measurable explanations about the universe, he stated. Intriguingly, Krauss pondered a potential interaction between universes-- that could be like two brains coming together. Likely scientific advancements in the decades ahead, include creating life in the lab from scratch, AI & computers becoming self-aware, and the merging of biology & computers. Such developments, Krauss noted, will change the very conceptions of what we mean by life. [embedded content]

Astronomers see through the Milky Way’s dust

 ... to track where radiation is coming from at the center of the galaxy The center of our very own galaxy might be one of the Universe’s most mysterious places. Astronomers have to probe through thick dust to see what’s going on there. All that dust makes life difficult for astronomers who are trying to understand all the radiation in the center of the Milky Way, and what exactly its source is. A new study based on 20 years of data—and a hydrogen bubble where there shouldn’t be one—is helping astronomers understand all that energy. It’s an astronomical peculiarity that in some ways we know more about other galaxies than we do about our own. Scientists have examined the energy coming from the center of thousands of other spiral galaxies in visible light. But for our own Milky Way, that knowledge is blocked by thick clouds of gas and dust. A team of researchers examined decades of data from the Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper telescope (WHAM) for clues about the Milky Way’s energy. Their results are in a paper titled “Discovery of diffuse optical emission lines from the inner Galaxy: Evidence for LI(N)ER-like gas.” The lead author is Dhanesh Krishnarao from the

THE ZOONOTIC THREAT: into the smart cities with you!

 ... the ‘biodiversity’ lie & agenda 2030 The UN seeks to remove humans from 30% of land and inland water, and considers this "even more important than climate change!" A narrative is being crafted with COVID-19 to justify forcibly moving people off the land and farms, into the smart cities, in the name of "habitat" and "biodiversity." It may sound reasonable, but what does it REALLY mean? Total control. Christian breaks it down. [embedded content]

There's a 'desert' in the middle of the Pacific

 ... here's what lives there In the centre of the South Pacific, there's a place as far away from land as anyone on Earth could ever hope to get. The ocean is different there. These distant waters lie at the heart of the South Pacific Gyre, the centre of which holds the 'oceanic pole of inaccessibility': the ocean's remotest extreme, aka Point Nemo (a name meaning 'no-one'), famous otherwise for being a spacecraft cemetery. But aside from the ghosts of burnt-up satellites, what dwells under these far-off waves? Not much, scientists have long thought. Despite taking up 10 percent of the ocean's surface, the South Pacific Gyre (SPG) – the largest of Earth's five giant ocean-spanning current systems – is generally considered a 'desert' in terms of marine biology. Nonetheless, stuff does live there, even if organic life in these waters (and the seabed below it) is few and far between, due to a range of factors. These include distance from land (and the nutrient matter it provides), the way water swirling currents isolate the centre of the gyre from the rest of the ocean, and high UV levels in this part of the ocean. In truth, though, we

RoundUp Scandal Still Plaguing Bayer

By Jefferey Jaxen Recent headlines continue to tell the story: Bayer’s Roundup-Cancer Settlement Plan Hits Snag writes Bloomberg. Bayer’s Roundup Settlement Comes Up Short states...

18 sailors injured as US military ship catches fire

 ... & is covered in massive plume of smoke in San Diego The USS Bonhomme Richard has caught fire at a naval base in San Diego. Footage from the scene shows a large plume of smoke emitting from under the ship's deck; one explosion and injuries among the crew have been confirmed. The fire triggered a massive response, with multiple fire engines and ambulances seen at the pier. "Eighteen Sailors have been transferred to a local hospital with non-life threatening injuries," US Naval Surface Forces wrote on Twitter a while later. Officials also announced that all the crewmembers had been evacuated from the ship and accounted for. So far, it remains unclear what triggered the blaze. Local fire department said that at least one explosion occurred aboard the ship during the blaze. The USS Bonhomme Richard is among the nine big-deck amphibious assault ships in the US inventory, capable to carry multiple helicopters, rotary aircraft or up to six VTOL jets. The vessel spent years with the US forces in Japan before being transferred to San Diego for an overhaul in 2018. The fire is the second major incident San Diego, that is a major ship-building and naval hub, seen over

Mom and baby share 'good bacteria' through breast milk

A new study has found that bacteria are shared and possibly transferred from a mother's milk to her infant's gut, and that breastfeeding directly at the breast best supports this process. A new study by researchers at the University of British Columbia and the University of Manitoba has found that bacteria are shared and possibly transferred from a mother's milk to her infant's gut, and that breastfeeding directly at the breast best supports this process. The research, published today in Cell Host & Microbe, found that certain bacteria, including Streptococcus and Veillonella, co-occur in mothers' milk and their infants' stool, and this co-occurrence is higher when infants nurse directly at the breast. "Our study confirms that breast milk is a major driver of infant gut microbiota development," said the study's senior co-author Dr. Stuart Turvey, a professor in UBC's department of pediatrics and investigator at BC Children's Hospital. "We found that breastfeeding exclusivity and duration was strongly associated with a baby's overall gut microbiota composition and that breast milk bacteria shape a baby's gut microbiome to a similar degree as other known modifiers of the gut microbiota such as birth mode—meaning a cesarean-section or vaginal delivery." According to the researchers,

Mountains of microplastics forming at the bottom of the ocean

Plastic may have found its way into the ocean's circulatory system. We already know our love for plastic is as deep as the deepest depths of the ocean. Because, of course, we found it there, way down at the bottom of the Mariana Trench. It takes a special kind of submarine to make that nearly 36,000-feet dive. But candy wrappers? Bon-bon voyage. And while those unwelcome discoveries demonstrate just how pervasive this plastic plague has become, there may be something even more unsettling about these new denizens of the deep-sea. Scientists haven’t been able to account for most of the 8 million tons of it that we heave into the ocean every year. But a new study may have finally answered that question.  The research found that plastic is moving into the deep-sea neighborhoods that anywhere from 500,000 to 10 million species call home. But zip-loc bags among giant spider crabs and tube worms and vampire squid are one thing. Plastic is also finding its way to the vents that literally stir the oceans. Those slow-moving masses of water near the ocean floor, dubbed thermohaline currents, act like a vast circulatory system. They swish around oxygen and nutrients vital to life

NASA's powerful Hubble space telescope

 - has beamed back a striking photo of a 'fluffy' galaxy with a ghostly, empty centre Galaxy NGC 2275, captured by the Hubble Space Telescope, July 2, 2020. NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope recently photographed a fluffy-looking galaxy 67 million light-years away. The galaxy’s centre is quiet, since early star formation used up all its gas long ago. Two upcoming NASA telescopes will succeed Hubble and capture our own galaxy and the universe beyond in unprecedented detail. NASA’s most powerful space telescope, Hubble, captured a uniquely picturesque galaxy in a photo the agency released on Thursday. From New York pizza to Maine lobster rolls, we rounded up the most iconic food in every U.S. state Every state has its own iconic food — Idaho potatoes are world famous, and New York pizza is legendary. Here's a look at the most iconic... From New York pizza to Maine lobster rolls, we rounded up the most iconic food in every U.S. state The galaxy, called NGC 2775, is located 67 million light-years away and doesn’t seem to be forming stars that much anymore. Astronomers can tell that’s the case because of the relatively empty, clear bulge at the galaxy’s centre. When it

Lawrence Krauss – hidden dimensions where the laws of physics are very different

Prof. Lawrence Krauss discussed dimensions cosmology, and science. Currently there is no empirical evidence for dimensions beyond our own, yet he speculated there could be hidden dimensions where the laws of physics are completely different. Gravity might leak off into another dimension, which could explain why its effect is so weak, he added. Upcoming experiments with new particle accelerators might yield definitive signs for such extra dimensions, said Krauss. However, String Theory, which posits an 11-dimensional universe, while highly touted, has yet to yield any measurable explanations about the universe, he stated. Intriguingly, Krauss pondered a potential interaction between universes-- that could be like two brains coming together. Likely scientific advancements in the decades ahead, include creating life in the lab from scratch, AI & computers becoming self-aware, and the merging of biology & computers. Such developments, Krauss noted, will change the very conceptions of what we mean by life. [embedded content]

Astronomers see through the Milky Way’s dust

 ... to track where radiation is coming from at the center of the galaxy The center of our very own galaxy might be one of the Universe’s most mysterious places. Astronomers have to probe through thick dust to see what’s going on there. All that dust makes life difficult for astronomers who are trying to understand all the radiation in the center of the Milky Way, and what exactly its source is. A new study based on 20 years of data—and a hydrogen bubble where there shouldn’t be one—is helping astronomers understand all that energy. It’s an astronomical peculiarity that in some ways we know more about other galaxies than we do about our own. Scientists have examined the energy coming from the center of thousands of other spiral galaxies in visible light. But for our own Milky Way, that knowledge is blocked by thick clouds of gas and dust. A team of researchers examined decades of data from the Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper telescope (WHAM) for clues about the Milky Way’s energy. Their results are in a paper titled “Discovery of diffuse optical emission lines from the inner Galaxy: Evidence for LI(N)ER-like gas.” The lead author is Dhanesh Krishnarao from the

THE ZOONOTIC THREAT: into the smart cities with you!

 ... the ‘biodiversity’ lie & agenda 2030 The UN seeks to remove humans from 30% of land and inland water, and considers this "even more important than climate change!" A narrative is being crafted with COVID-19 to justify forcibly moving people off the land and farms, into the smart cities, in the name of "habitat" and "biodiversity." It may sound reasonable, but what does it REALLY mean? Total control. Christian breaks it down. [embedded content]

There's a 'desert' in the middle of the Pacific

 ... here's what lives there In the centre of the South Pacific, there's a place as far away from land as anyone on Earth could ever hope to get. The ocean is different there. These distant waters lie at the heart of the South Pacific Gyre, the centre of which holds the 'oceanic pole of inaccessibility': the ocean's remotest extreme, aka Point Nemo (a name meaning 'no-one'), famous otherwise for being a spacecraft cemetery. But aside from the ghosts of burnt-up satellites, what dwells under these far-off waves? Not much, scientists have long thought. Despite taking up 10 percent of the ocean's surface, the South Pacific Gyre (SPG) – the largest of Earth's five giant ocean-spanning current systems – is generally considered a 'desert' in terms of marine biology. Nonetheless, stuff does live there, even if organic life in these waters (and the seabed below it) is few and far between, due to a range of factors. These include distance from land (and the nutrient matter it provides), the way water swirling currents isolate the centre of the gyre from the rest of the ocean, and high UV levels in this part of the ocean. In truth, though, we

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Ghislaine Maxwell Pedo Sex-Trafficking Investigation Launched In Virgin Islands

Ghislaine Maxwell - who's facing six charges in New York over her alleged role in Jeffrey Epstein's pedophile sex-trafficking ring, is also under investigation in the US Virgin Islands. The revelation comes in a July 10 filing to intervene in a lawsuit Maxwell filed against Epstein's estate seeking reimbursement for legal fees, and claiming that Epstein had repeatedly promised to support her financially, according to The Sun. The Island's Justice Department is "investigating Maxwell's participation in Epstein's criminal sex trafficking and sexual abuse conduct," read the court papers. Epstein infamously owned Little St. James island, dubbed 'pedo island' over accusations that he would fly underage girls there to fulfill his sexual desires and those of his associates. Famous guests reportedly include Bill Clinton, Prince Andrew, Stephen Hawking, Les Wexner and others. One accuser, Chaunte Davies, says she was raped by Epstein over the course of several years before finally parting ways with him in 2005. Accuser Chaunte Davies, Ghislaine Maxwell Now 40, Chaunte says the ex-Wall Street banker performed a sex act on

German Police Hunt for 'Forest Rambo' After He Disarmed Four Officers Single-Handed

German police have entered their third day of a manhunt for 31-year-old Yves Etienne Rausch, who is accused of pulling a firearm on four officers and disarming them during a police check. Nicknamed “Forest Rambo” by German media, Rausch has been on the run in the area around the town of Oppenau in Baden-Württemberg since Sunday after he managed to disarm and allegedly confiscate pistols from four police officers by himself. Believed to be dangerous, Rausch is said to be armed with a bow and arrow, a knife, and several pistols. He is also said to be equipped with camouflage clothing and night vision goggles, German tabloid Bild reports. In a press release, local police described Rausch as standing 5’7″ tall, with a goatee, a bald head, and possibly wearing glasses. They also asked locals not to pick up any hitchhikers. Police spokesman Wolfgang Kramer commented on the incident in which Rausch is said to have disarmed the officers, saying: “Suddenly he pulled his pistol and aimed at the officers. Completely surprised by the situation, they no longer had a chance to react to the dangerous situation.” Germany Considers Disbanding Special Forces Unit After Discovering Members Hold Nationalist Views https://t.co/CWSpGc2l3g — Breitbart

UK Bans New Huawei 5G Equipment from 2021, Full Ban from 5G by 2027

Digital Secretary Oliver Dowden has confirmed the ban on the addition of new equipment from Huawei to UK 5G networks, and all Huawei components must be removed from Britain’s 5G by 2027. The move came after Five Eyes allies warned of the security risks of using the “effectively state-owned” Chinese tech firm. Mr Dowden made the announcement in the House of Commons on Tuesday, weeks after the U.S. imposed sanctions on Huawei, barring the sale of American components to the Chinese company over security concerns. It represents a significant reversal by Prime Minister Boris Johnson, who agreed in January on a contract for Huawei to build 35 per cent of Britain’s 5G network. “This has not been an easy decision, but it is the right one for the UK telecoms networks, for our national security and our economy, both now and indeed in the long run,” the British digital secretary said, according to the BBC. The decision follows a ruling from the National Security Council that Huawei should not be used in any part of Britain’s 5G. The new restrictions also apply to Huawei’s broadband components. The judgment officially came as a result of a review conducted by the National Cyber Security

The Law, and Origin Story of Istanbul’s Iconic Hagia Sophia

On Friday July 10, Turkey’s highest court has repealed a previous decision that saw the 1934 conversion of the Hagia Sophia from a mosque into a museum, and put restrictions on prayers being performed at the site. A week earlier, Turkey’s Council of State received arguments by lawyers pressing for an annulment of a 1934 decision by its Council of Ministers which turned the historic monument into a museum. In the case, lawyers appealed to the foundation charter of the Hagia Sophia itself, personal property of Sultan Mehmet II, which forbids changes of any sort to the endowment, its lands, and use. “At the heart of this controversial case is a bid to restore religious freedoms,” says Mark Jefferson, an analyst for Omran Strategic Studies Institute. “Early modern Turkey cracked down on the practice of faith, wearing of religious garb and expression of religion, and one of the policies they enacted was to deny its religious Muslim community a place that served as a deeply symbolic place of prayer for nearly five centuries,” he says. “It is worth recalling the ‘Declaration on the Inadmissibility of Intervention in the Domestic Affairs of States and the Protection of Independence and